Category Archives: Canning & Preserving

Plum Butter

There’s an old abandoned house on the bike path not far from where I live, with half its windows boarded up and the rest broken out. The roof is beginning to cave in, and every time I pass by I feel a twinge of sadness as I wonder about the people who built the house and planted the fruit trees lining the property. But for a while this summer, the sadness was trumped by joy and anticipation as the fragrant blossoms of spring swelled into thousands of prune plums, weighing down the ancient trees along the bike path.

abandoned house with plum trees

Last year, I lamented the fact that there were no plums at the farmer’s market due to a late frost (and had to console myself with this mushroom tart). This year was the exact opposite.

prune plums on tree

The plums started turning ripe in mid-August, and they were everywhere I looked. I returned to the trees several weekends in a row, plastic bags bulging and cutting into my fingers as I trotted back down the bike path. My sister and I picked until we couldn’t carry any more, and we still didn’t even come close to making a dent in the crop. Runners and bike commuters stopped to gorge themselves on plums, and some of the old locals pulled their cars onto the property and loaded up boxes from the opposite side of the fence. All in all, we ended up processing just over 100 pounds, and there were still plums dropping off the tree when we finally cried uncle.

tree full of prune plums

big bowl of ripe italian prune plums

First on the to-make list was plum butter. I made it once a couple years ago, and it’s one of the best preserves I’ve ever tried. Tart and sweet, with complex notes of vanilla bean just below the surface. I love to spread it on toast, swirl it into plain yogurt, and put it in ebelskivers.

Plum butter doesn’t use pectin; it’s cooked down until very thick and then canned. I made several batches of varying thickness, and can tell you firsthand that they are all delicious — some are more like thin preserves, and others are so thick that I have a hard time spreading them. It’s tricky to get a very thick plum butter as you’ll need to stir it constantly at the end to keep it from scorching, but it’s well worth the effort. Even if you end up with syrup, I promise it will be delicious.

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Pisco Lemonade

pisco_lemonade_with_tarragon

Sorry for the lack of recipe posts, you guys. I haven’t actually been cooking a lot of new things lately, which is funny because we’re totally overrun with fresh produce. Instead, I’ve spent late nights canning, freezing, and making pickles, and most of my meals are some variation on this. Not that I mind much.

Look at all the beans I’ve been putting away:green_beans_and_yellow_and_purple

This book is my favorite reference for canning and freezing (I have the 1970s burnt orange hardcover edition, a family heirloom). I’ll do an in-depth post on canning a little later this month, once the tomatoes get going.

edamame_to_be_frozen

And I just started a batch of long-fermented dill pickles from this book, in my new crock from The Savvy Hen. I’ll let you know how those turn out in a few weeks.

making_pickles

And tonight, we’ll be putting incubator #1 into “lockdown,” meaning we take the eggs out of the automatic turner, increase the humidity, and try our best not to touch the incubator until all the chicks hatch. They’re due Wednesday, but we’ll be starting the live stream whenever we see movement from the eggs, which could be a few days before. (Disclaimer: Last time they hatched a day early)

We’re also doing the first candling on incubator #2 tonight, which has eggs from our neighbor, a few from our hens (in case they’re fertile this time) and also a dozen free-range eggs from the grocery store. So again, we might have a lot that aren’t developing (but I’m excited to find out).

Oh right, I promised you a drink.

pisco

After a day of harvesting and selling flowers and veggies at a pop-up neighborhood farmer’s market, I was ready for a cocktail. My sister, who taught me the joy of a good Pisco Sour years ago, came up with this little gem — it’s similar, but doesn’t involve powdered sugar, or egg whites. It’s simple, refreshing, and easily to make for a crowd. Cheers!

Pisco Lemonade

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Total Time: 5 minutes

Yield: 1 cocktail

Pisco Lemonade

Simple, refreshing, and great for a crowd.

Ingredients

  • (for each cocktail)
  • 1 shot (1.75 oz) Pisco
  • 3.5 shots (6.25 oz) lemonade, ideally fresh-squeezed (and please not the powdered kind)
  • 1 sprig tarragon, mint, or your favorite herb

Instructions

  1. Combine pisco and lemonade in a shaker with ice. A standard shaker will hold two drinks' worth.
  2. Shake and strain into glasses.
  3. Garnish with a sprig of fresh herbs (tarragon works well).
http://www.homegrowngourmet.org/pisco-lemonade/

Chokecherry Jelly

chokecherries_in_the_sun

Last weekend, I got a text from my neighbor: “The chokecherries are ripe. Get them before the birds do!” And so my plans for the evening changed. I grabbed my buckets and headed across the street, where clusters of tiny cherries glistened on the bushes lining our dirt road.

chokecherries_everywhere

Chokecherries are a wild cherry that is native across most of the United States, and I’ve been harvesting them ever since I was little. At family picnics I’d tuck clusters of the bright, astringent jewels into my pockets for later, only to be forgotten until laundry day when my mom would open the washer to find a pile of purple-stained dress shirts. There wasn’t much she could say; she got in trouble for the same thing as a kid.

add_some_unripe_chokecherries_for_extra_pectin

Eaten right off the tree, chokecherries are extremely tart, and they’re mostly pit. But mixed with a whole lot of sugar, their delicious flavor comes out — imagine a much better version of the fake “wild cherry” stuff.

Chokecherries are easy to identify if you know what you’re looking for (namely, serrated leaves and small cherries hanging in clusters). But do a little reading first to ensure you’ve got chokecherries and not buckthorn, which would make for a truly memorable jelly (but not in a good way).

chokecherries_have_serrated_leaves

Whenever I harvest chokecherries, I tend to go a little overboard. I look at all those perfect little cherries, hours away from being stripped by the birds and the hornets, and I’m compelled to collect as many of them as humanly possible.

And then two or three hours later, sweaty and mosquito-bitten, I stand staring at 20 pounds of chokecherries that need to be picked through, and I wonder why I always get myself into these situations.

chokecherry_stemming_station

So if you’re going to be de-stemming 20 pounds of chokecherries, or even 5, there are a few things you’re going to need:

  1. Ideally a helper, but only someone with good attention to detail and fine motor skills. They’ll only be creating more work for you if they miss a bunch of stems and/or blemished fruit.
  2. That TV series you’ve been meaning to marathon-watch, books on tape, anything to keep your mind occupied for hours on end.
  3. Cocktails and caffeine, but not too much of either. (Refer back to #1).

This time, I set aside the ripest cherries for a batch of chokecherry wine, and the less-ripe cherries for jelly (since they add pectin and help it set).

I rinse the cherries in small batches (about 1-2 cups) as I pick through them, then once they’re all clean I boil and strain them to make juice for jelly. Or syrup, as the case may be.

milling_chokecherry_juice

The first time I attempted a batch of jelly on my own, my Mom passed down a bit of chokecherry wisdom she got from my grandmother: “If you try to make jelly, you’ll get syrup, and vice versa. So if you want jelly, try for syrup.”

Fortunately, I like chokecherry syrup even better than I like jelly, so I was secretly glad when my first batch didn’t set. For the second batch, I used my neighbor’s tried-and-true recipe and ended up with a delicious, perfectly set batch of chokecherry jelly. So hopefully it’ll work like a charm for you too, but if you get syrup, that’s just part of the challenge.

It’s possible to remake jellies that don’t set, but sometimes they get grainy so I just call it good at syrup (or “preserves” if it’s lumpy.)

outdoor_canning_setup

And a few words about my canning setup: I do most of my canning outdoors now, and I highly recommend doing it this way. While it’s entirely possible to do all of this on an electric stove in a tiny kitchen (and I have, many times) it’s so much better to do all the boiling outside while the cool evening air drifts through the house. It works so well for me that I eventually got a second propane burner and hot water canner so I can have multiple batches going at once, and they’re already getting plenty of use this summer.

sterilize_jars_by_boiling_at_least_10_minutes

The only downside is the mosquitoes, and the fact that it can be a little hard to see the jars at night (but a headlamp fixes that problem).

cool_on_rack_and_enjoy_the_sound_of_jars_sealing

Few things are as satisfying as lifting jars out of a hot water bath and listening to the *PING!* as each one seals. But picking wild cherries on the side of a road, and then turning them into something utterly delicious? Right up there.

Chokecherry Jelly

Prep Time: 2 hours

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Total Time: 2 hours, 30 minutes

Yield: about 5 cups

Chokecherry Jelly

Wild chokecherries grow across most of the United States, and they make a delicious sweet-tart jelly.

Ingredients

  • About 4 pounds chokecherries, de-stemmed (to make 3 1/2 cups chokecherry juice)**
  • 4 1/2 cups sugar
  • 1 (1.75 oz) box powdered pectin
  • **About 1/3 of your chokecherries should be underripe, as the additional pectin will help your jelly set. If not, you may end up with syrup, which is also delicious.
  • Special equipment:
  • Clean 4 or 8 oz. canning jars with new lids
  • A 21.5-quart hot water canner
  • Canning funnel and utensils (tongs, jar lifter, etc.)

Instructions

    To make juice:
  1. Place your washed, de-stemmed cherries in a large pot and cover with filtered water. Bring to a boil and simmer for 30-40 minutes. Remove from heat and allow to cool slightly.
  2. Crush the fruit using a muddler or potato masher and hang it in a jelly bag to strain overnight, or if (like me) you don't have a jelly bag run the cherries through a sieve or foley mill. Allow the juice to settle for a few hours and carefully pour the top layer into another jar, leaving the sediment behind.
  3. Sterilize the jars:
  4. Put jars (a few more than you think you'll need) into a hot water canner and cover with at least 2 inches of water. Bring to a boil and boil for at least 10 minutes, then turn off the heat.
  5. Bring a small saucepan of water to a boil and remove from heat. Put jar lids in the hot water and cover until you're ready to use them.
  6. To make the jelly:
  7. Put a few small plates in the freezer to chill (you'll use these to test the jelly). Measure out the sugar and set aside.
  8. Bring your juice to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring frequently.
  9. Add the pectin and stir until smooth, then bring to a full rolling boil and add the sugar all at once. Boil for exactly one minute and remove from heat. Skim any foam from the top.
  10. Dribble a small amount onto your chilled plate and put it back into the freezer for a minute. Then, pull it out and hold it sideways. If the jelly stays put, it's ready to process.
  11. Process the jelly:
  12. Remove your jars from the hot water bath and drain upside down on a clean towel.
  13. Using a canning funnel, carefully ladle the jelly into your jars, leaving 1/4" of air space at the top. Wipe rims with a clean damp cloth and top with sterilized lids and screw tops. If you have a partial jar do not process it, just use it ASAP.
  14. Carefully place jars in canner, adding boiling water to bring level 2" above jar tops. Bring canner to a boil and then process for 5 minutes, plus additional time for altitude (at 6.000 feet, I process mine for 15 minutes). Find your processing time here.
  15. Remove jars from water bath and allow to cool. Check jars to make sure they have sealed, any jars that don't seal should be stored in the fridge and used first.
http://www.homegrowngourmet.org/chokecherry-jelly/

Making the best of sour grapes: Ver Jus

verjus

Last weekend, I helped my favorite neighbor put nets up over her grapes. With four of us chattering as we worked our way down the rows, the morning flew by and soon we were celebrating our victory over the birds and raccoons with a glass of Haymaker’s Punch in the shade. As she put it, “many hands make light work.”

In the process, we clipped about 3 pounds of unripe grapes that were blocking the nets or too close to the ground. I immediately thought of ver jus, a sour grape juice that I learned about from a winemaker friend in Sonoma.

unripe_grapes

Ver jus (also vert jus, or “green juice”) has been around since the Middle Ages, and can also be made from unripe apples and berries, or from sorrel (which is taking over my herb garden, so I’ll definitely be trying that soon). It’s used in place of citrus or vinegar, and it’s “wine-friendly,” meaning it won’t overpower the palate as vinegar will if you’re drinking something fancy.

The last place I lived had a big fence full of concord grapes, and I once made a wildly unsuccessful batch of ver jus there. I’d just used up the last of the bottle I bought in Sonoma, and I had several clusters of grapes that were refusing to ripen, so I just ground them up, put the juice through a sieve, and bottled it — sediment and all.

It went moldy within a few weeks.

I’ve been pining for a second chance ever since, so I was overjoyed when the entire basket of sour grapes appeared on my porch last weekend. This time, I did my research first.

in_the_hopper

To make verjus, you’ll need at least a few pounds of unripe grapes, plus some citric acid to help prevent oxidation. You’ll also need a food mill — I used a Foley mill last time, which works great but requires some elbow grease. This time, I had the food mill attachment for my Kitchen Aid mixer and it made quick work of the grapes. I just put them in the hopper, and watched as it churned out a big carafe of juice and a pile of dried skins and seeds. If you have a juicer, it’ll probably work great too.

first_of_the_juice

I highly recommend having a machine do the juicing if you can, especially because the faster you work the prettier your verjus will be (it turns brown as it oxidizes). For 3 pounds of unripe grapes, put about 1/2 teaspoon of citric acid in the collection vessel and swirl it periodically as the juice collects — this will also help to preserve the delicate green color of your ver jus.

And even if you’re not milling them by hand, don’t underestimate the time you’ll need to remove all the grapes from their stems before you juice them — it’s time-consuming to be sure. So pour a glass of wine, put on a movie, call a friend, whatever you need to do to make it fun instead of tedious.

Once you’ve pressed all the juice from your grapes, put it through a fine-mesh sieve and pour it into a sealed jar without much airspace.

pour_and_let_settle

There’s still some stuff that needs to be filtered out, but it’s too fine to get trapped in a sieve — so just let it settle completely, then carefully pour your juice off the top. The smaller the neck of your jar in relation to the sides, the easier this will be (i.e. don’t use a wide-mouth jar).

decant_juice_off_solids

When made this way, ver jus can be kept in the refrigerator for about 3 months. Some people also add grain alcohol, sugar, and sometimes sulfites to preserve it for long-term storage, but I’ve never had a big enough crop to warrant that. From 3 lbs I got about 30 ounces of ver jus, and my neighbor and I have both made a sizeable dent in our bottles already.

Use it on garden salads, fish, desserts, quick pickles, any dish where you want to add bright acidity without overpowering the flavor.

Ver Jus

Prep Time: 1 hour, 30 minutes

Total Time: 3 hours

Yield: 30 fluid ounces

Ver Jus

This is a great way to use sour (unripe) grapes. Use anywhere you want acidity but not the intense flavor of vinegar or citrus -- this is delicate enough that it won't clash with wine.

Ingredients

  • 3 pounds unripe grapes
  • 1/2 teaspoon citric acid
  • Special Equipment
  • Food mill or juicer
  • Fine-mesh sieve

Instructions

  1. Remove all stems from grapes, weeding out any grapes that are wrinkled or very small.
  2. Wash grapes thoroughly.
  3. Put 1/2 teaspoon citric acid in the bottom of your collection vessel.
  4. Begin juicing grapes, working as quickly as possible. Swirl collection vessel as you go to incorporate citric acid.
  5. Pour juice through a sieve and collect in a sealed jar without much airspace. Let stand until the sediment finishes settling at the bottom.
  6. Carefully pour the juice off the top without disturbing the sediment at the bottom. If some of it gets in the bottle, just let it settle and pour it off once more.
  7. Store bottles in the refrigerator for up to 3 months.
http://www.homegrowngourmet.org/making-the-best-of-sour-grapes-ver-jus/